Facebook spies on your texts, likely sells them for profit

February 27, 2012

Listen to the author read this entire article out loud (9:05)

February 27, 2012

So, Facebook reads your text messages, according to the the London Sunday Times in a subscribers-only article, referenced all over the blogosphere today (Fox News, Tech Crunch, and many others).  If you have the Facebook mobile app, then that same mobile app, without asking your permission, has been showing your text messages to Facebook, who makes a profit off of it.

Companies don’t act unless it’s profitable.  Unwritten economic law.

Unsurprising for Zuckerberg, whose name is synonymous with Facebook, and who is its  ultimate boss, the CEO – the final decider.  He who will only eat meat killed by his own hand, has sank his sharp, blood-stained, carniverous teeth even further into the privacy of his user base.  This action, repeated millions of times, comprises the lifeblood of both his company, and his duly ample bank accounts.

Assange: "Villain" today, "terrorist" tomorrow?

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Censored poetry, recovered and published

February 26, 2012

Censored:

 

If, and only if, justice, then peace.

Why, war, why?

Carl Rittenhouse Larson

February, 2012

For the record, my poetry, shown above, has been censored.  This is a fact.

Most likely, it was censored by an algorithm, but still.  In a way, it was written by an algorithm.

I’m thinking about getting “Censored poet” tattooed on my chest, maybe in Mandarin.

Expanding on the censored poem

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Evidence that what I say happened, happened: Duel part 2

February 21, 2012

February 21, 2012

I recently challenged Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg to a duel of words.  I posted an image to my Facebook wall, along with thousands of other people, who posted the same image to their own walls.  Eventually, that image was taken down, from everyone’s wall, by Facebook.  The image wasn’t lewd, it wasn’t illegal, it wasn’t obscene, it was simply this:

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Hollow logic behind the biggest threat to American liberty

February 19, 2012

February 19, 2012

Charlie Dent is a politician from Pennsylvania who has introduced the Enemy Expatriation Act (EEA), which would revoke the citizenship of American citizens suspected of links to terrorism.

The interviewer’s only decent question is whether the EEA would strip convicted terrorists of their citizenship, or just those suspected of terrorism.

Dent responds by alluding to “investigations,” conducted by the state department, not trials conducted in the public eye, in our legal system.  So the answer is “suspected,” not “convicted,” because convictions only happen in court.

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The presidential primary is a joke

February 18, 2012

February 18, 2012

There’s no democracy in Maine this year.  Voters from Hancock and Washington counties have been reported (by Fox News, actually) as being “not counted.”  Some polling stations were closed, due to a phantom snowstorm that never materialized.  There’s an easy way around all of this – we just need to do it.

Maine in February of 2012 is a sad example of a large underlying problem, everywhere in America, and all through our history: in-person elections are inherently flawed, and we need to get our elections online.

Sure, there will be challenges, but those hurdles are going to be much easier to overcome than the catastrophic, corruptable, logistics nightmare of holding an in-person election.

I’m from Oregon, where it’s 100% vote by mail.  Maybe that makes me more predisposed to support a system where it evolves even further – vote by internet.  People should have a choice of how they vote.  Right now, few have any choice in how they vote.

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A peek under the hood of the creative process

February 17, 2012

February 20, 2012

Random information is generated by the human mind. From that random information, humans are extremely skilled at unconsciously, unawarely, hacking down 99+% of that randomly generated information, removing data based on their own consciously understood priorities, thereby prioritizing that random information, or (in other words) ranking that random information in relation to the individual’s understood goals.

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Zuckerberg challenged to a duel, over censorship, of words

February 13, 2012

 

February 13, 2012

I recently made a post to my Facebook profile that was promptly un-posted, by Facebook.  Whether it was a human, a flagger, an algorithm, or a silver unicorn with an impaled tiger on its horn, bellowing more loudly than a blue whale, at the Sunrise, from a mountaintop, underwater, in space – it doesn’t matter.  All that matters is the post was deleted.

The only word I got for that is censorship.

It’s been real, Facebook, but I’m done for a while.  I won’t do the account de- and re-activation dance; I’ll just stop commenting.

Facebook, I give you consistently good content, and in return, you spam me with ads for Wal-Mart.  I don’t care if Jim Phillips “liked” Wal Mart.  I’ve never been inside one.  I’ll keep it that way.

Have you heard about Google+?  (Circle me!)  It’s this cool new social network where adults can interact, and talk about things other than Jersey shore.

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Uncensored Internet Access is a Human Right

February 8, 2012

Podcast

February 8, 2012

This election year, don’t vote for politics as usual.  Instead, let’s amend the constitution.

Amendment 28: Uncensored internet access is a human right.

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What is Pythagoreanism.com all about?

February 6, 2012

February 6, 2012

Pythagoreanism.com is probably the worst-categorized website online – if you’ve ever wondered what this is all about (for example, why it’s called Pythagoreanism), this video should clear up some of your confusion:

 

[Direct link to video]